Scottish Review of Books - Wikipedia

The Scottish Review of Books is a quarterly literary magazine published in Scotland

Scottish Review of Books | Facebook

Faced by declining coverage in newsprint, is the role of the professional literary critic moribund? Where does the reader go for both a critique of a new work and re-examination of a classic? If you care about the future of reviews, literary criticism and Scotland’s cultural identity this is the event for you. Alan Taylor, Editor of Scottish Review of Books leads an expert panel to explore the issues.

Scottish Review of Books

Talk:Scottish Review of Books - Wikipedia

In years of uncertainty, where platforms for literary criticism and general arts coverage are changing, Scottish Review of Books holds firm to the best of the past while pushing and challenging traditional boundaries to establish a secure and exciting future for critical writing in Scotland.

Re-design by  of Scottish Review of Books. Cover illustrations by Kate Anderson, Oliver Pitt and Derick Carss.

An experienced book publicist (25 years+), Jan Rutherford’s company works across the media, new and traditional, promoting books, authors, reading and writing. Jan worked with Scottish Book Trust for ten years on mentoring and professional development for writers and for the last five years she has chaired the board of the Scottish Review of Books. She is the UK publicist and event organiser for international best-selling author, , Project Manager for and non-executive Director at , Scotland’s largest independent book publisher. She is on the steering group for .

Get this from a library! Scottish review of books.. [Scottish Arts Council.;]


Scottish Review of Books welcomes submissions from critics. If you have a review that you would like to submit please email a brief synopsis and a very brief biography to the editor, Alan Taylor for consideration via our page.An experienced book publicist (25 years+), Jan Rutherford's company works across the media, new and traditional, promoting books, authors, reading and writing. Jan worked with Scottish Book Trust for ten years on mentoring and professional development for writers and for the last five years she has chaired the board of the Scottish Review of Books. She is the UK publicist and event organiser for international best-selling author, , Project Manager for and non-executive Director at , Scotland’s largest independent book publisher. She is on the steering group for .The Scottish Review of Books is funded through the support of our cherished subscribers, print and online advertising, the goodwill (and financial support) of its editors and board members, and much appreciated grant assistance from Creative Scotland. Creative Scotland have now confirmed support for 2017 to cover part of the editorial, print, distribution and online costs. We are very grateful for their continued support. As this issue of the Scottish Review of Books demonstrates, we have in recent decades, historiographically speaking, been making up for lost time. Never before has there been such an embarrassment of riches.Alan has been a journalist for over 30 years. He was deputy and managing editor at , and Associate Editor of the . He has contributed to numerous publications, including , and , and edited several acclaimed anthologies – , The Secret Annexe, (Canongate), and. He has been the editor and board member of the Scottish Review of Books since 2004 and is on the steering group for IN THIS ISSUE of the Scottish Review of Books we are privileged to a publish a diary by Candia McWilliam, in which she describes how she is coping with a disease called blepharospasm. Defined byChambers as “spasm of the eyelid”, it sounds relatively innocent. It is not. As Ms McWilliam explains,...IN THIS ISSUE of the Scottish Review of Books we are privileged to a publish a diary by Candia McWilliam, in which she describes how she is coping with a disease called blepharospasm. Defined byChambers as “spasm of the eyelid”, it sounds relatively innocent. It is not. As Ms McWilliam explains,...Faced by declining coverage in newsprint, is the role of the professional literary critic moribund? Where does the reader go for both a critique of a new work and re-examination of a classic? If you care about the future of reviews, literary criticism and Scotland’s cultural identity this is the event for you. Alan Taylor, Editor of Scottish Review of Books leads an expert panel to explore the issues.Rosemary, who is The Herald newspaper’s literary editor, will chat with her husband Alan Taylor, editor of the Scottish Review of Books, about her novels Dacre’s War and After Flodden.